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Today at the Museum of Fine Arts - Boston

rsc and I went to the MFA - Boston today to see the Rembrandt exhibit - open for members preview now and then on public exhibit from Sunday until mid-January. After we saw that and went to lunch we looked to see what other special exhibits were on. In the basement where they often have something interesting there was one called John Currin Selects, a selection of works that this artist (unknown to me) picked.

On the wall was a thought provoking statement by him about paintings that included:
Americans view paintings as movies that don't move
Europeans view movies as paintings that move
.

I found a couple of examples of paintings that moved. During my walk around this exhibit I found three paintings that had the property that if you looked at them from afar and walked towards them you really felt that you were walking into the scene. The first was an unidentified artist's work called Meditation by the Sea that had a small (relative to the scene) person standing on a beach with the sea on the right and a cliff (if I remember it correctly) on the left. I felt that I was really approaching this person at the beach by the sea and would be right there soon as I walked from 50 feet away to 2 feet away.

The second was a Monet: Road at la Cavée Road at la Cavee with hills on each side and the sea behind the gap. My walk felt that that I was about to go between those hills on my way the sea.

The third was a Van Gogh: Houses at Auvers Van Gogh: Houses at Auvers that showed a path with a person on it leading up to some houses in the background. I felt I was about to get onto that path an approach those houses.